Staying Fit With Golf As Your Sport

There are people who, although they want to get into a fitness activity, are reluctant to play any sport because they’re worried that their body may not be able to meet the demands of playing a particular sport. This perception could be because most of the sports they see on TV, such as basketball and football, require a lot of stamina and endurance. However, there’s one sport that doesn’t require much stamina but can still be an excellent fitness avenue, and that is the sport of golf.

Golf is generally perceived as a sport of leisure and is not really recommendable for those who want to keep fit. However, this sport can actually provide excellent physical benefits. Here are some of them:

Workout for the heart and lungs – Some people may not be aware of it, but a full day on the green once a week can actually provide a good workout for your heart as well as your lungs. If you walk the full distance going from hole 1 to 18, it can get your heart moderately pumping. You don’t have to have the stamina of professional athletes to do that, but it still gives the vital organs mentioned earlier a nice workout.

Calorie-burning – It’s true that golf is not a very physically demanding sport, but it can still help you in your goal of burning calories, which can help in losing or maintaining weight. Just by playing a 9-hole course (which entails some walking and carrying your bag) can already burn more than 700 calories. You do that twice every week and you can rack up a total of 1,400 calories burned weekly.

Stress-buster – For people who are already in their 50s or beyond, stress can be very debilitating. Playing golf can help reduce stress while you stay fit at the same time. It can also be an excellent outlet for social interaction, which can help you forget about stressful thoughts.

Lower risk of injury – Although all physical sports carry with them varying levels of injury risks, golf is considered (and is quite obvious) as among the sports that have the lowest in the area of risk for injury. Even if injuries do come, they’re not as major as those from more physically demanding sports. That’s a win-win situation for those who want to stay fit but don’t want to engage in more injury-prone sports.

Get into this sport now and start enjoying its physical benefits minus the high risk for injury.

No comments, shop8admin, February 6, 2018

The Rules Of Photography Knowing When To Break Them.

Creative photography is a mix of many ingredients; art and technology, skill and patience, cold mechanical knowhow and individual flair.

For a beginner learning the basics, it would be nice if there was a simple set of rules to follow to make the whole thing easier. Surely someone could just tell you what aperture to use in a given situation, or how to structure a composition to get the best results every time?

Photography is a lot like learning to drive. With a car, you need to know the road rules, and you need to know the basic skills of steering, accellerating and braking. These can be learned easily with a bit of practice. But even when you have mastered the essentials, you still need to get to know your car, because each car is a little different. Then you need experience with night driving, wet-weather driving, off-road driving…

What you must understand is that following the rules will only take you so far. In photography, you will find that rules help you in the beginning, and some rules will stay with you throughout your career. The trick is to understand when the rules don’t apply, or when you should choose to ignore them. This is the type of knowledge that can’t easily be taught. It comes with experience, and is what gives you indiduality as a photographer.

Below are just a few of the rules that, for an experienced photographer, are just made to be broken.

Photography Rule #1. Outdoor Photos Should Be Taken In The Early Morning Or Late Afternoon. This is one of the first principles of landscape photography, and can be applied to almost any outdoor photography. The softness and warm colour of the sunlight at these times adds beauty and character to almost any scene. It also creates much lower contrast, allowing you to avoid harsh shadows and over-exposure of the highlights in your photos.

When can you break this rule? I can think of two situations immediately.

Black and white photography is defined by contrast rather than by subtle colour, so you often want stronger shadows to create the best image. For this reason, black and white photos are often best taken closer to the middle of the day when the light is stronger.

Rainforest photography is also best in the middle of the day, but this time you don’t want bright sunlight; you want cloudy weather to create an nice even light throughout the forest. Otherwise the patches of light coming through the canopy will create ‘hot spots’ all over your image.

Photography Rule #2.The Rule Of Thirds. The rule of thirds is an excellent guide for a beginner learning about composition. In simple terms, it divides your photo into three parts, vertically and horizontally. The dividing lines are the best places to position long objects in a photo (like trees and horizon lines). The points where the lines intersect are the most effective places to position smaller objects for most impact.

Photos that are taken according to the Rule Of Thirds appear balanced. They satisfy our natural sense of visual order and simply look ‘right.’ Unfortunately, the world is not so easily organised as the rule, so it is impossible in nature to take every photo this way. Moreover, sometimes you may decide to ignore the rule, giving more impact to the photo by shaking up the normal balance of the composition.

When can you break this rule? Here is one obvious example, but I am sure you can think of many more.

Sunset photos feature colourful skies, and silhoettes in the foreground. If you have a truly spectacular sky, it doesn’t make sense to fill a third of the picture with empty blackness. You may choose to tilt the camera up to make a feature of the sky, and reduce the area filled by the foreground.

Rule #3. Your Lightmeter Is Always Right. Most of the time you can trust your lightmeter. If it indicates your photo is well exposed, it probably will be…but not always.

When can you break this rule? When there is a big difference in the level of light between the subject and the surroundings.

You may be photographing a person, an animal, a flower etc. in full sunlight, but the background is shady. This is a very effective way of making your subject stand out from the surroundings. In this situation, the different levels of light are bound to trick the lightmeter. In fact, if you take your photo on auto, your subject will most likely be overexposed. The best approach is to switch your camera to manual, and adjust your aperture or shutter speed until the photo is underexposed by one or two stops. This will darken your background and bring the subject into perfect exposure.

Can you see a pattern developing here? Rules are there for a reason, and your skills will improve in leaps and bounds if you learn them and practice them. But having done that, you are ready to take the next step. Start experimenting outside the rules and see where it takes you. Knowing and following the rules will make you a good photographer. Choosing how and when to break them will make you even better.

No comments, shop8admin, February 6, 2018



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